Colds and Flu: Don’t Believe the Hype

As we careen toward the holidays, just remember that the “cold and flu season” is a fiction cooked up by the health care industry, which is undeniably brilliant at creating a demand and serving it, grooming a client base and appearing to cater to it.

In a nutshell, here’s how it’s constructed:

We are highly suggestible creatures and the health care industry exploits this human foible enormously. Since we’re taught by multiple sources to fear ourselves and the world when we’re children and at our most malleable, it only takes subtle reinforcement throughout our lives on a daily basis to keep this fear in place. The world is consistently represented as a place that is out to get us, rather than one that we’ve created and are holding aloft moment to moment through our thoughts, beliefs, and emotions. We love to point out the stories about the frog that boils to death as the heat is increased incrementally or the elephant that is held captive only by a rope and a chair. However, we easily forget that these examples of perceived powerlessness reflect our own predicament as well. It may be funny to see a hypnotist make someone act like a chicken, but if it’s that easy just think how readily we can be manipulated around our emotions.

The fear that is instilled in us results in a profound state of disconnection between our minds and bodies, and the notion that we have any influence over our own well-being is sacrificed. This has the effect of making the health care system appear to be our only option and sets the table for the expert to enter the scene and allay our fears, tell us what’s wrong with us, and make us feel better. Mission accomplished—we’ve successfully abdicated our responsibility for healing ourselves. Since it is this disconnection between mind and body that is the source of illness in the first place, the health care system is well-positioned to play us a like a violin, All it needs at this point is to activate those fears by creating random bogeymen in its running narrative about health, so that it can cheerfully serve the illness that it creates.

Whether we succumb to a cold or flu turns on whether we are grounded or not. Being grounded is a state of the human energy field and it fluctuates many times throughout any given day. Whether we are grounded or not in any given moment depends on many different factors, but for this post we’ll just talk about fear. When we’re grounded we have at least a basic communication between our mind and body and we’re literally in a place where we can choose not to get ill. When we’re not grounded, the mind separates from the body and we are subject to whatever our mind makes up about health and that usually means defaulting to our conditioning, which is to be afraid. Now we’re a siting duck for a self-fulfilling prophecy around illness.

Here’s what it looks like:

It’s the dead of winter and I’m enormously grateful that I haven’t picked up the “crud” that seems to be taking down everyone else. I go into a meeting where there are a couple of people sniffling and in that instant is my appointment with destiny. Because of my aforementioned conditioning around health, my mind starts to perceive the conference room as a dangerous place. If I entered the conference room in a grounded state, I’m now in danger of becoming ungrounded based on how my mind is evaluating the environment through a filter of fear.

To make matters worse, I’m resistant to recognizing that I’m afraid, ‘cuz you know I’m an adult and all. Instead, my mind only recognizes its outrage (“Who the hell let those sick people in here?!”). Now I’ve lost my connection to both my body and my true emotional state, which is fear. Now I’m sufficiently ungrounded that I’m no longer in a position of choice and by the time I leave the meeting I’m starting to feel a familiar scratchiness in my throat. All the evidence now points to my own inevitable encounter with said crud. My appointment with destiny has degenerated into a blind date with fate.

Here’s how it could have gone:

If I have some experience with knowing the importance of staying grounded, the sniffling people in the room are my cue to make sure I’m grounded rather than a source of fear. Without a doubt, there is still some fear that surfaces but it is of the healthy sort that elicits vigilance rather than a fear that creates a state of helplessness. Throughout the meeting I check to make sure I’m still grounded, because I know I’m on the knife’s edge of either being in a position of choice or falling into my conditioned fear response. The more I can demonstrate to myself that I can be in a room with sick people and not get sick, the more it will override my conditioning. I used to get colds and flu as much as anyone until I became a chiropractor and recognized the connection between staying grounded and not picking up a sick client’s illness.

Here is the easiest way I know to get grounded: Sit down and make sure your feet are flat on the floor. Visualize the soles of your feet connected deep into the earth and bring your breath down into your belly. Imagine a line passing vertically through the length of your spine into the earth. Lightly touch the top of your head with your fingertips to bring your energy down from your head and into the rest of your body. Lastly, make sure the tip of your tongue is resting against the hard ridge of the palate just above your teeth. Rotate your attention between the soles of your feet, the line through your spine, and your breathing. When you’re grounded again, you may feel a subtle shift of being back in your body, more connected to the earth, or just in a more relaxed or stable state.

It can make a huge difference to start your day in a grounded state. For an investment of just a couple of minutes you can insure that you’re not leaving the house with a bulls-eye on your forehead. Checking to make sure you’re grounded throughout the day has many benefits. For starters, you’ll be much less susceptible to colds and flu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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