Tag Archives: chronic

Why Is It So Hard to Find Urgency? Part 2

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This is an excerpt from my upcoming book, “The Art of Getting Out of the Way.”

3. Until we’re willing to experience the nature and extent of the pain we’re in, we have a limited perspective on our situation and how to find a way out of it. Urgency springs from a transfer of energy that occurs when we allow ourselves to be vulnerable to the pain underlying an habitual behavior or emotional state. The energy that was applied to suppressing the pain becomes available when we stop the suppression. It is a shift from a mental effort—suppression—to an effortless act—being vulnerable to our feelings.

That available energy is what we draw from to stay grounded and make a conscious decision to change an undesirable situation. Without that available energy, having a choice in the situation is in name only, because we will reflexively choose our conditioned, default behavior time and time again.

By the time we’re young adults, we’ve portioned out all almost all of our life force toward propping up a persona that we can live with and display to the public. Unfortunately, the script written for that persona is based on childhood adaptive strategies, traumas (real and perceived), borrowed beliefs, misinterpretations, fantasies, and false information. Besides making it very difficult to have a direct experience of what is right in front of us, it is our unwillingness to disassemble this web of misperceptions that stands between us and urgency.

In addition, episodes of illness and injury are woven into the story of our life and become associated with repressed emotions, such that a complete healing of the physical ailment requires revisiting the unresolved emotional component. We often fear what may lie on the other side of healing, because it will likely include the exposure of our hidden agendas around maintaining a certain degree of pain in our lives, and those agendas have to be sacrificed in order to achieve real healing.

In my 15 years in health care, I’ve watched clients (and myself) repeatedly choose chronic pain and illness—even death– over honest self-examination. We permit a depth of healing that corresponds to, but does not exceed, the degree of self-exposure that our ego can comfortably handle. In other words, the depth of our healing is directly proportional to how badly we want to know who we are and what motivates our behavior.

4. The mind leverages small discomforts to exert maximum control over our access to urgency. There is a whole universe of sensations and feelings that informs us about our emotional, psychological, and physical state at any given moment, but our mind dutifully chooses which ones to recognize and which ones to ignore and suppress based on the version of reality we’ve painstakingly assembled.

On cue, our mind-body produces mild, context-specific discomforts that signal the very tip of the pain we will have to confront in order to create change in our lives. However, these physical annoyances are not consciously acknowledged as heralding fear, rage, shame or whatever taboo emotion threatens us so profoundly. The more undefined the danger, the more the mind can keep us under its thumb. These discomforts and annoyances surface in that slippery interface between our everyday awareness and the unconscious, and may take many forms: jaw clenching, chest tightness, holding one’s breath, drowsiness, sour stomach, dizziness, and neck pain, to name just a few.

The discomfort’s message is a subtle, but powerful implication that whatever repressed emotions are uncovered will result in a worst-case scenario: death, destruction, public humiliation, or total loss of control. Until the repressed emotion is actually allowed expression, it is only indicated by this sensation-based signature of the repressed emotion.

Here’s an example. A man desperately wants to tell his father he loves him, but every time the thought occurs to him it is accompanied by a tightening of his throat. This has occurred so many times over the years that he no longer notices the discomfort, although without fail it has the effect of squelching the simple words, “Dad, I love you.” The throat tightening delivers the message that if he were to tell his father this simple fact, something bad will happen. It also masks the real reason he cannot say these words: a deep resentment for something that happened in childhood for which he’s never forgiven his father.

Not telling his father he loves him is the son’s way of withholding love in payment for that episode that happened so long ago. The underlying statement is, “I won’t tell you I love you until you admit that you were wrong.” The throat constriction is tied to the son’s inability to relinquish being right about the incident, and the trade-off is the loss of emotional connection to his father.

Since the son will not consciously admit to himself that he cannot let go of a petty grudge against the person who raised him, all that remains is the throat tightening to control his behavior. The end result is the son’s rationalization, “It just wasn’t the right time. I’ll tell him the next time I see him.” And urgency is successfully sidestepped yet again.

This is one of the mind’s primary methods of keeping us in our prison, both at the individual and collective levels. In this way, our past is always informing our present experience, and spontaneity, hence urgency, is kept at bay.

5. The mind may create a constant crisis state to avoid real urgency. This is a very successful strategy as evidenced by people who use rehab like a vacation home, make a hobby of attending multiple support groups, use permanent disability as a gravy train, or spend all their time putting out other people’s fires. If a person’s baseline state is to be in a crisis situation, how will he possibly be able to discern when he actually is in a crisis?

Hitting bottom for these people will be elusive, since bottom has become the norm. This phenomenon also attests to the extremely subjective nature of pain. Someone may, for instance, be willing to subject himself to the physical pain of heroin withdrawal, but not have the courage to confront the shame that fuels the addiction.

For someone to escape from this horrible trap, they have to recover a baseline experience of well-being, or at least neutrality. For someone who has lived her entire life in a crisis mode, this can be extremely threatening because feeling good has become such an alien experience and is not easily trusted.

If healing completely is too much of a threat to a victim identity, then the mind knows precisely where to draw the line to feel just well enough to keep the identity operational.

Wellness Briefs–“Medication Toxicity”

All of the conditions described in these posts are effectively treated with Pattern Release Energetics (PRE).

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Do you ever wonder why pharmaceuticals have endless lists of possible serious side effects? One reason is because after our bodies have made maximum use of the medication and excreted as much of the excess as possible, whatever traces of it remain can get stored in a variety of tissues, including muscle, nerve, brain, and organ tissues. Residual medication can settle in these tissues indefinitely and create a toxic environment that can persist long after the medication has been discontinued. This toxicity can produce symptoms such as chronic muscle and joint pain, nerve pain (neuropathy), organ system dysfunction, allergies, headaches, and insomnia.

Chemotherapy meds, antibiotics, antidepressants, interferon, blood pressure medication, and blood thinners are just a few of the medications I’ve encountered stored in clients’ tissues and causing the previously mentioned symptoms. The mere fact that a person must be weaned off a medication already suggests that his or her system has become unnaturally accustomed to having the substance in its tissues, since it is considered risky to simply stop altogether. As with infections, stimulation of the lymph system with PRE encourages the body to release medication toxicity in a safe and efficient manner.

Unfortunately, medication is often used as a long-term treatment strategy which makes the body dependent, lazy, and unresponsive. Over time, this can result in the medication causing the very same symptoms that it was intended to eradicate. If you have symptoms whose origins no one has been able to trace, and you’ve been on a prolonged course of a medication at some point in your life, then medication toxicity should be considered as a possible source.

Wellness Briefs–“Infection Medley”

All of the conditions described in these posts are effectively treated with Pattern Release Energetics (PRE).

http://www.patternreleaseenergetics.com

For both people and pets, multiple types of infections often occur concurrently. For example, an infection constellation composed of bacterial, viral, yeast, and fungal sources, or any combination of these, is common. If only the bacterial component is diagnosed and treated with antibiotics, it can obscure, and perpetuate, the other infectious elements. In fact, antibiotics can actually create the environment for these other infections to enter the scene in the first place.

The non-bacterial infections may mimic the symptoms of a bacterial infection, so it’s essential to know what exactly is present from the start, before the picture is muddied with any external stimuli. The dangers of indiscriminate use of antibiotics have been known for decades now, but it is still surprisingly rampant.

A grouping of different infections needs to be released layer by layer, in a specific sequence dictated by your mind-body. Otherwise, the healing is incomplete and encourages what is referred to as a “chronic, low-grade infection” or some such wording. Very often, there are emotional patterns that are being repressed in association with a particular infection layer, and these also need to be identified along with the infection type. Infections of any kind can be quickly cleared through activation of the lymph system with PRE, and people can easily be taught how to do this for themselves, as well.

Have You Been Saddled with a Garbage Can Diagnosis?

Have You Been Saddled With a Garbage Can Diagnosis? Part I

As a chiropractor I was often the last resort for someone whose experience with previous health care practitioners was less than satisfying. Kinda goes with the territory when working in a fringe profession. So, neither one of us had anything to lose. I would either be the latest source of that person’s dashed hopes or I’d be able to bring a fresh set of eyes and find something the doctors missed.

One of the shortcomings of the medical model is its reliance on diagnosis. A doctor often lives or dies with it, and so will the patient. This jump to identify and label can actually impede a healing process because it can severely restrict the condition’s freedom to reveal itself. Instead of witnessing what’s going on in front of us, we impose a diagnosis that is generated by the intellect and its relentless obsession to categorize, explain, and rationalize.

The establishment of a diagnosis is treated as a victory of sorts, as if to say, “now we know what we’re dealing with.” When our intellect feels like it has reached a resolution of sorts, then it will often abort all further investigation and fall into the default protocol associated with that particular diagnosis. All it does is relieve our poor assaulted psyches of the anxiety of uncertainty. Well, certainty is often our worst enemy.

Also, the next step after diagnosis is to suppress whatever has just been named. So, say goodbye to finding root causes if the goal is simply to push everything back below the surface and turn off the body’s distress signals. In the rush to identify and suppress, the clues to the condition’s source are trampled.

This is especially true of a so-called “garbage can diagnosis.” It’s a label that is slapped onto a symptom or group of symptoms because the practitioner doesn’t feel that the principle of do no harm extends to a willingness to say “I don’t know.” As health care practitioners, we sometimes trick ourselves into thinking that we have someone’s best interests in mind when all we’re doing is covering our ass as a professional.

GCD’s are superficial umbrella terms used to classify symptoms that can have a wide variety of possible origins. A GCD is a prime example of using language to obscure rather than clarify, something American culture has elevated to an art form in more arenas than we can count. For example, the diagnosis of sciatica might be applied to a condition whose root cause might be any of the following: muscle spasm, lumbar disk bulge or herniation, infection, fibula misalignment, or repressed grief.

GCD’s also worm their way into everyday language, which accentuates their superficial nature. The words “TMJ,” “impingement syndrome,” “chronic fatigue syndrome,” “fibromyalgia,” “tendonitis,” and “bursitis,” glibly trip off our tongue like we’re talking about the latest hijinks of some Hollywood beefcake.

A good indication that you’ve been slipped a GCD is that you don’t significantly improve with the treatment protocol that accompanies the diagnosis. The condition ends up being managed rather than resolved because the diagnosis is a cop-out in the first place, and thus can leave a person in health care purgatory for years. It can cause even more pain and stress for the patient just because someone thought they needed to give a name to something.

I’m only going to cover some of the most common ones I’ve encountered, and I’ll be making generalizations that are based on my own experience.

Fibromyalgia: This is the mother of all GCD’s. There was surely dancing in the streets in the medical community when this diagnosis finally hit the streets. No longer did GP’s have to wince at seeing these folks in the waiting room, and have the joy of telling them after a 30-minute phantom evaluation that “it’s all in your head.”

Conditions like these of global pain or chronic fatigue often remain mysteries because their origin is precisely in that area that most practitioners and patients don’t want to go–repressed emotions. This doesn’t mean that the physical pain is not real; it most certainly is as real as the pain from an acute ankle sprain. The difference, though, is that the pain is being generated by the body to inform the person that unless these emotions get some expression, the pain will persist.

One of the dangers of this diagnosis is that if the person is resolved to remain in the dark about their repressed emotions, now they’re free to use the diagnosis as official confirmation that there’s something wrong with them. So, the diagnosis becomes ammunition for behaviors and beliefs that further alienate the person from her/his true feelings. This is a GCD that can perpetuate a particularly brutal cycle of suppression, particularly if extended use of antidepressants is also part of the treatment protocol.

Pneumonitis, costochondritis, angina, thoracic outlet syndrome, dyspnea: I’ve lumped these together because I’ve seen them all applied to what turned out to be rib misalignments, which are quite common. This is sad, because rib misalignments are one of the simplest corrections to make, and generally provide a quick resolution to the problem. When ribs aren’t properly aligned, it can cause intense, knife-like pain, particularly with deep breaths and particular movements, such as twisting of the upper body. Other possible symptoms are numbness and tingling in the arm and hand, or poor circulation to the arm.

Ribs can be misaligned both in the front where they join the sternum, producing a pain which can mimic heart-related symptoms, or in the back where they join the spine. The cause is generally an acute injury, such as a fall or car accident, repetitive stress, or a period of intense coughing and/or sneezing.

Stay tuned! Part II of this blog post will include old favorites like TMJ, carpal tunnel syndrome, leg length inequality, plantar fasciitis, scoliosis, tension headaches, and chronic low back pain.